The ABC of Topical Skin Nutrition (Aestheticians/SkinTherapists only)

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Many Therapists find it confusing when starting to build on their ingredient knowledge and ask for a break down of the most often used vitamins in cosmeceutical products. This is a simplified version of a very complex science and does not replace the need for Therapists to learn and understand the organ they work with on a daily basis – the skin!

Educate yourself constantly and start with the skin cells. Understanding this first will not only make it easier for you to explain the need for skin care products containing these ingredients to your client; it will also increase your retail sales ten fold. Every client will walk out of the spa with home care products and your appointment schedule should be full with return treatments.

Now this doesn’t mean these vitamins are only for these conditions, but these are the skins that need to have these ingredients as a priority.

1. Vitamin A = Acne & Ageing.

Retinyl Palmitate/Acetate, Retinol, Retinaldehyde, Retinoic Acid

Retinoids (family of Vitamin A) are used to repair cellular damage and cell turnover. All skin needs this vitamin to improve cell function.

Client Tip: “Retinoids normalize cells – from cell function to cell turnover”

2. Vitamin B3 = Barrier & Brown (pigmentation) Vitamin B3: Niacinamide, Nicotinamide

Vitamin B3 assists with the repair of the skins barrier and inhibits the transfer of the melanosome to the keratinocyte – improving hyperpigmentation.

Client Tip: “Vitamin B3 improves the barrier function – hydrating the skin and protects the skin from pigmenting”

3. Vitamin B5 = Blood & Barrier

Vitamin B5: Panthenol

Vitamin B5 assists with wound care and improving the skins barrier. Client Tip: “Soothes and inflamed skin”

4. Vitamin C = Collagen & Colour
Vitamin C: Ascorbic Acid, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Ascorbyl

Tetraisopalmitate, and Ascorbyl Glucoside

Vitamin C assists with the collagen production by improving fibroblast production. It improves hyperpigmentation as it acts as a tyrosinase inhibitor. Vitamin C is also a powerful antioxidant; therefore assists with cell damage caused by free radicals.

Client Tip: “A great ingredient to improve the signs of ageing with a better quality collagen production while also improving the appearance of skin discolouration.”

Remember, this is a simplified version of ingredient science that all Therapists must know to be successful in treating client’s skin conditions.

I hope it helps.

Donna x

 

©Donna Cummins-Campbell and MySkin-Coach, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Donna Cummins-Campbell and MySkin-Coach with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Is a Moisturiser enough?

beautiful woman hands with cream

My post this week comes from a question one of my followers has sent through:

“My Skin-Coach, my skin care regime is limited to cleansing of an evening and using a light Moisturiser in the morning and again in the evening. I am 32, is this enough?” signed, Jessie

Continue reading

Omega 3 and Your Skin

 

Cell membrane Omega 3

Did you know many skin conditions will improve by adding Omega 3 to your daily diet?

So, what are Omega 3 oils?

These oils , that the body is unable to manufacture, are like the traffic lights for your cell membranes. When we ingest adequate amounts, our cell membranes allow waste to leave the cell and nutrients to access  our cells.  Continue reading

Successful Acne Management

Successful Acne Management

Successful Acne Management

One of the most distressing of all skin conditions, is acne. As a teenager, I suffered terribly with an aggressive form of Cystic Acne and was very grateful for the help from a Skin Therapist. Weekly, I had treatments to treat the condition. Fortunately with the greatness of time and science, we can now achieve faster and better results by following these steps: Continue reading

My Morning Cuppa

I have been sitting in the beautiful winter sun this Sunday morning and enjoying my morning cup of tea (after my lemon juice), and thought you may like to hear the benefits of Green Tea and how it plays a role in skin care.

We all know we need a diet rich in Antioxidants and Green tea is a wonderful source of antioxidants and is used in promoting cardiovascular health and reducing serum cholesterol levels in laboratory animals and humans. Studies suggest that green tea contains dietary factors that help decrease the development of some infectious diseases. Green tea also has diuretic, stimulant, astringent, antibacterial, antifungal, anticarcinogenic, thermogenic and anti-inflammatory properties. Green tea has also been reported to enhance our immunity and many skin care companies are now using it as an effective ingredient in their moisturisers.

I prefer to drink it and carry a flask when I am lecturing. I also have a beautiful Lemon Myrtle tree in my garden and I place a leaf in my tea cup or flask to give the tea a zingy lemon flavour. I have also added fresh ginger to my tea, and in winter this is adds warmth to the drink and is also good for the digestive system.

For sensitive skins, you can use your cooled Green Tea as a facial spritzer. Using a mist spray bottle, pour cooled tea and use throughout the day, it acts as a hydrator and the Green Tea contains antioxidants. Great for inflamed skin or as a skin cooler & hydrator in the summer months.

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